Calendar

February 10 to March 12, 2019

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Tour

Public Tours at Dia:Beacon


Dia:Beacon

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27/08/2016 12:30 27/08/2016 15:00 Europe/London Public Tours at Dia:Beacon Dia:Beacon provides guided tours every Saturday and Sunday at 12:30 and 2 pm. Tours are free with admission. Reservations are not necessary but can be made in person at the admissions desk.      Dia:Beacon FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Public Tours at Dia:Beacon
<p>Photo: Don Stahl</p>

Poetry Reading

Sarah Arvio and John Keene


Dia:Chelsea

Readings in Contemporary Poetry

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19/02/2019 18:30 19/02/2019 23:45 Europe/London Sarah Arvio and John Keene Event DetailsTuesday, February 19, 2019, 6:30 pmDia:Chelsea535 West 22nd Street, 5th FloorNew York City  Readings in Contemporary Poetry curator, Vincent Katz provided an introduction for the evening's reading. Free for Dia members; $10 general admission; $6 admission for students and seniors Advance ticket purchases are recommended. Tickets are also available for purchase at the door, subject to availability.  Sarah Arvio’s recent book of new translations from the works of Federico García Lorca, Poet in Spain (Alfred A. Knopf, 2017), has been widely praised. Her earlier books are night thoughts: 70 dream poems & notes from an analysis (Alfred A. Knopf, 2013), which is a hybrid of poetry, essay, and memoir, Sono: Cantos (Alfred A. Knopf, 2006), and Visits from the Seventh (Alfred A. Knopf, 2002). She is the recipient of a Rome Prize of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and Bogliasco Foundation fellowships, among other honors. Arvio also worked for many years as a translator for the United Nations in New York and Switzerland.Gacela VIIOf the Memory of Love Don’t take my memory of you leave it in my heart trembling white cherry treeJanuary’s martyr A wall of bad dreams divides me from the dead I’m as pained as a fresh lily before a plaster heart All night in the orchard my eyes are like two dogs All night eating the poison quinces Sometimes the wind is a tulip of fear a sick tulipin the winter dawn A wall of bad dreams divides me from the dead Silent grass covers your body’s gray valley On the arch where we meet hemlock is growing Leave me my memory of you leave it in my heart John Keene is an artist, a translator, and a writer. His recent books include: the story and novella collection Counternarratives (New Directions, 2015); the art book GRIND (Image Text Ithaca Press, 2016), an art-text collaboration with photographer Nicholas Muellner; and the poetry chapbook Playland (Seven Kitchens Press, 2016). He also has translated the Brazilian author Hilda Hilst’s novel Letters from a Seducer (Nightboat Books, 2014), and numerous works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from French, Portuguese, and Spanish. His recent honors include an American Book Award (2016), a Lannan Literary Award for Fiction (2016), a Windham-Campbell Prize for Fiction (2018), and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2018). He chairs the African American and African studies department, and teaches English, African American studies, and creative writing at Rutgers University-Newark in New Jersey. Words     When you said people did you mean punish?                          When you said friend did you mean fraud?When you said thought did you mean terror?                          When you said connection did you mean con?When you said God did you mean greed?                          When you said faith did you mean fanatic?When you said hope did you mean hype?                          When you said unity did you mean enmity?When you said freedom did you mean forfeit?                          When you said law did you mean lie?When you said truth did you mean treason?                          When you said feeling did you mean fool?When you said together did you mean token?                          When you said desire did you mean desert?When you said sex did you mean savagery?                          When you said need did you mean nought?When you said blood did you mean bought?                          When you said heart did you mean hard?When you said head did you mean hide?                          When you said health did you mean hurt?When you said love did you mean loss?                          When you said fate did you mean fight?When you said destiny did you mean decimate?                          When you said honor did you mean hunger?When you said bread did you mean broke?                          When you said feast did you mean fast?When you said first did you mean forgotten?                          When you said last did you mean least?When you said woman did you mean wither?                          When you said man did you mean master?When you said father did you mean smother?                          When you said father did you mean fatal?When you said sister did you mean surrender?                          When you said brother did you mean brutal?When you said fellow did you mean follow?                          When you said couple did you mean capital?When you said family did you mean failure?                          When you said mankind did you mean market?When you said society did you mean sickness?                          When you said democracy did you mean indignity?When you said equality did you mean empty?                          When you said politics did you mean power?When you said left did you mean lost?                          When you said right did you mean might?When you said republic did you mean rich?                          When you said wealthy did you mean wall?When you said poor did you mean prison?                          When you said justice did you mean just us?When you said immigrant did you mean enemy?                          When you said refugee did you mean refusal?When you said earth did you mean ownership?                          When you said soil did you mean oil?When you said community did you mean conflict?                          When you said safety did you mean suspicion?When you said security did you mean sabotage?                          When you said army did you mean Armageddon?When you said white did you mean welcome?                          When you said black did you mean back?When you said yellow did you mean yield?                          When you said brown did you mean down?When you said we did you mean war?                          When you said you did you mean useless?When you said she did you mean suffer?                          When you said he did you mean horror?When you said they did you mean threat?                          When you said I did you mean island?When you said tribe did you mean trouble?                          When you said name did you mean nobody?When you said news did you mean nonsense?                          When you said media did you mean miasma?When you said success did you mean sucker?                          When you said fame did you mean game?When you said ideal did you mean idol?                          When you said yesterday did you mean travesty?When you said today did you mean doomsday?                          When you said tomorrow did you mean never?When you said hear did you mean hush?                          When you said listen did you mean limit?When you said write did you mean wound?                          When you said read did you mean retreat?When you said literacy did you mean apathy?                          When you said fiction did you mean forget?When you said poetry did you mean passivity?                          When you say art do you mean act?     Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Sarah Arvio and John Keene
DIA_CFD_JULY9-25

Special Event

Hudson Valley Free Day


Dia:Beacon

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24/02/2019 00:00 24/02/2019 23:45 Europe/London Hudson Valley Free Day Hudson Valley residents receive free admission to Dia:Beacon on the last Sunday of each month. The Hudson Valley encompasses the following counties: Albany, Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Sullivan, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester. Additionally, City of Beacon residents (including the adjacent Hudson Valley communities of Chelsea, Fishkill, and Glenham) receive free admission to Dia:Beacon every Saturday and Sunday. Please present identification and proof of residence at the admissions desk. Hudson Valley Free Days at Dia:Beacon are made possible by Kiki McMillan, Charlie Pohlad, and the Pohlad family.     Dia:Beacon TURE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Hudson Valley Free Day
<p>Photo: Jackie Roman</p>

Poetry Reading

Major Jackson and Peter Schjeldahl


Dia:Chelsea

Readings in Contemporary Poetry

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05/03/2019 18:30 05/03/2019 23:45 Europe/London Major Jackson and Peter Schjeldahl Event DetailsTuesday, March 5, 2019, 6:30 pmDia:Chelsea535 West 22nd Street, 5th FloorNew York City  Readings in Contemporary Poetry curator, Vincent Katz provided an introduction for the evening's reading. Free for Dia members; $10 general admission; $6 admission for students and seniors Advance ticket purchases are recommended. Tickets are also available for purchase at the door, subject to availability.   Major Jackson’s books of poems include: Roll Deep (W. W. Norton & Company, 2015); Holding Company (W. W. Norton & Company, 2010) and Hoops (W. W. Norton & Company, 2006), both finalists for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work – Poetry; and Leaving Saturn (University of Georgia Press, 2002), which was awarded the Cave Canem Poetry Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in poetry. He is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts, Whiting Writers’ Award, and has been honored by the Pew Fellowship for the Arts and the Witter Bynner Foundation in conjunction with the Library of Congress. Jackson is the Richard Dennis Green and Gold University Distinguished Professor in the department of English at University of Vermont, Burlington, and a graduate faculty member of the Creative Writing Program at New York University. He serves as the poetry editor of the Harvard Review. Enchanters of Addison County      We were more than gestural, close-listening,the scent of manure writing its waft on the leavesoff Route 22A. By nightfall, our gaze fleckedlike loon cries, but no one was up for turnipsnor other roots, not least of which the clergy.Romanticism has its detractors, which is whywe lined the road with tea-lit luminariesand fresh-cut lemons. We called it making magic,then stormed the corners and porchesof General Stores, kissing whenever cars idledat four way stop signs or sought Grade A maple syrupin tin containers with painted scenes of horse-drawnfarmers plowing through snow. The silhouetted, rustedfarm equipment gave us the laidback heavenwe so often wished, and fireflies bequeathed earth stars, such blink and blank and bunk-a-bunk-bunk.And of course we wondered if we existed,and also too, the cows of the ancient pastures,and the white milk inside our headslike church spires and ice cream cones.Even after all of that cha-cha-cha, we still cameout of swimming holes shivering our hearts out. Peter Schjeldahl was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Minnesota. He dropped out of college and moved to New York City to pursue journalism. Schjeldahl published a few books of poetry in the 1960s and 1970s, including Since 1964: New and Selected Poems (Sun, 1978), until he abandoned poetry to pursue art criticism full time. Schjeldahl has written on art for numerous publications, including Artforum, Art in America, Vanity Fair, and Vogue. He was the art critic for the Village Voice from 1990 to 1998 and has since been a staff writer at the New Yorker. His writings on art and culture have been collected in four books of criticism, including The Hydrogen Jukebox: Selected Writings of Peter Schjeldahl, 1978–1990 (University of California Press, 1991) and Let’s See: Writings on Art from the New Yorker (Thames & Hudson, 2008). Schjeldahl’s honors and awards include a Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing, a fellowship from the Guggenheim Foundation, a Frank Jewett Mather Award, and a Howard Vursell Memorial Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. ARS  Hi How do you like this poem so far?If you like it, please let me knowDon’t be shy, step right upand praise me I need praise  Don’t worry that I will think you foolish or insincereEven if I think that, I’ll appreciate your thoughtfulnessAnd if you don’t like this poemdon’t worryConfess your dislike openly, I won’t be angryI will be able to tell you exactly how you’re wrongIt will a big relief to both of us And do you know? If more people like you tell me preciselywhat you think of me, my poems may get betterThey may get better than this one, even Do you think poetry about personal and professional and artisticinsecurity, yearnings for love and approval and honestcommunication, feelings of isolation, night sweats,paranoid imaginings, hysterical loathing and doubt andself-doubt, do you suppose writing on these topics is fun?Nor would these topics be among the Great Themesto which I’m positive I’m equal, if only youbastards would cough up some admiration, even fake it a littlefor me and my family and Art and future of humankind 1975     Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Major Jackson and Peter Schjeldahl
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Education Program

Saturday Studio


Dia:Beacon

Saturday Studio

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09/03/2019 10:30 09/03/2019 12:00 Europe/London Saturday Studio Event DetailsSaturday, March 9, 2019 10:30 am–12 pm Dia:Beacon3 Beekman StreetBeacon, New York Join practicing artists for a free monthly workshop of art making and play in the Learning Lab at Dia:Beacon. Designed for all ages, Saturday Studio is a family friendly program that is most suitable for children ages 5 and up. All families participating in the Saturday Studio program receive free admission to Dia:Beacon for the day. Saturday Studio begins promptly at 10:30 am on the second Saturday of every month. The reservation window is now closed; limited space is available on Saturday, March 9, and is offered on a first-come, first-served basis. The sign-up process begins in the admissions area at 10 am. For more information about the Saturday Studio artist educators and workshops, see the calendar of upcoming events or e-mail beaconprogram@diaart.org.     Dia:Beacon FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Saturday Studio
POS_Series C Reliefs, 1967

Lecture

Rita McBride and Ulrich Lehmann on Charlotte Posenenske


Dia:Beacon

DiaTalks

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09/03/2019 14:00 09/03/2019 23:45 Europe/London Rita McBride and Ulrich Lehmann on Charlotte Posenenske Event DetailsSaturday, March 9, 2019, 2 pm Dia:Beacon3 Beekman StreetBeacon, New York Free with museum admission. No reservations required. Rita McBride was born in Des Moines in 1960. She currently lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany, and Los Angeles. She received a BA from Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, and an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia. In 1988 she began to explore architectural and sculptural form in works ranging from small-scale objects to large-scale commissions. Her major public works include Obelisk of Tutankhamun in Cologne, Germany (2017), Bells and Whistles at the New School in New York (2014), and Mae West in Munich, Germany (2011). In 2017 Dia Art Foundation commissioned a sculptural intervention with lasers, Particulates, which was on view at Dia:Chelsea in New York City through 2018. McBride’s contribution to the exhibition catalogue Charlotte Posenenske: Work in Progress explores her own interest in progressive assembly and industrial logistics in relationship to Posenenske’s pioneering practice. Ulrich Lehmann studied philosophy, sociology, and art history in Frankfurt, Paris, and London. His research interests include the histories of ideas and material culture in late 18th-century and early 19th-century Europe, and the materiality, meaning, and praxis of contemporary design. He has contributed to a wide range of journals and edited collections on art, design, and material culture; his books include Josiah McElheny: Interactions of the Abstract Body (2014) and Tigersprung: Fashion in Modernity (2000). Lehmann is an associate professor in design practice and theory at Parsons School of Design in New York City, where he teaches studio practice and cultural histories. One of these courses, on the concept of prototyping, featured Rita McBride, whose expansive 2014 sculpture Bells and Whistles is installed at the New School.     Dia:Beacon FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Rita McBride and Ulrich Lehmann on Charlotte Posenenske
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Members’ Event

Closing Tour of Nancy Holt and Blinky Palermo


Dia:Chelsea

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09/03/2019 12:00 09/03/2019 23:45 Europe/London Closing Tour of Nancy Holt and Blinky Palermo Event DetailsSaturday, March 9, 2019, 12 pm Dia:Chelsea 541 and 545 West 22nd StreetNew York City   For all members. Join or renew today.    Join us for a private tour of Nancy Holt and Blinky Palermo: To the People of New York City during the exhibitions' final day on view at Dia:Chelsea. The tour will begin at 545 West 22nd Street.   RSVP to Sibia Sarangan at membership@diaart.org or 212 293 5602.         Dia:Chelsea FALSE DD/MM/YYYY FREQ=WEEKLY;BYDAY=SU,SA;UNTIL=20260601T235900; Closing Tour of Nancy Holt and Blinky Palermo